reverses diabetes type 2

🔥+ reverses diabetes type 2 05 Aug 2020 CHICAGO — Intensive lifestyle interventions and metformin therapy have had significant success in treating type 2 diabetes and should both be ...

reverses diabetes type 2 You can still live your best life. All you have to do is take action and stick with it. Understanding type 1. Here's what you need to know about type 1 diabetes.

icd 10 for secondary diabetes mellitus Skip to main content

reverses diabetes type 2 korean (⭐️ uncontrolled) | reverses diabetes type 2 for dummieshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Global Sites  

 

Accordion Title
Diabetes Types
  • Type 1 diabetes

    reverses diabetes type 2 reversal (🔴 blood sugar range chart) | reverses diabetes type 2 meal planhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called insulin dependent or juvenile diabetes, makes up about 5% of the diabetes cases in the United States. Most cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in those under the age of 30. Type 1 diabetics make very little or no insulin. Any insulin-producing beta cells they do have at the time of diagnosis are usually completely destroyed within 5 to 10 years, leaving them entirely reliant on insulin injections to live.

    The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, but a family history of diabetes, viruses that injure the pancreas, and autoimmune processes, in which the body''s body back to its normal balance.

    Ongoing treatment of type 1 diabetes revolves around daily glucose monitoring and control, eating a healthy planned diet, and exercising regularly. Regular exercise lowers blood glucose, increases the body''s hypoglycemia is not responding to oral glucose or for someone else to give them if the person has become unconscious. Acute conditions, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or kidney failure, may require hospitalization to resolve.

  • Type 2 diabetes

    Type 2 diabetes used to be known as non-insulin dependent diabetes or adult onset diabetes. Those affected may produce insulin, but it is either not in a sufficient amount to meet their needs or their body has become resistant to its effects. At the time of diagnosis, people with type 2 diabetes will frequently have both high glucose levels and high insulin levels, but they may not have any symptoms. About 90-95% of diabetes cases in the United States are type 2. It generally occurs later in life, in those who are obese, sedentary, and over 45 years of age. Factors associated with type 2 diabetes include:

    reverses diabetes type 2 meds (🔥 treatment algorithm) | reverses diabetes type 2 nurse teachinghow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Since Americans are becoming more obese and not getting enough regular exercise, the number of those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is continuing to rise and it is developing at younger ages.

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for adults age 45 and older and for adults who are under 45 years of age who are overweight and have any additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The ADA also recommends that children who are overweight and have two or more risk factors should be considered the 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 for diabetes screening.The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for adults age 45 and older and for adults who are under 45 years of age who are overweight and have any additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The ADA also recommends that children who are overweight and have two or more risk factors should be considered for diabetes screening.

    Signs and Symptoms

    People with type 2 diabetes may or may not have any noticeable signs or symptoms at the time of diagnosis. The signs and symptoms may be subtle at first and then worsen if the condition is not diagnosed and treated. See the section on Signs and Symptoms for detailed descriptions.

    Laboratory Tests

    In addition to diabetes tests listed above, used for screening, diagnosing and monitoring, a few other tests may be used in the evaluation of type 2 diabetes:

    • Diabetes autoantibodies – this test may help distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes if the diagnosis is unclear. The presence of one or more of these antibodies indicates type 1 diabetes.
    • Insulin, C-peptide – to monitor insulin production
    • Urine and/or blood ketone tests may be ordered to monitor people who present at the emergency room with symptoms suggesting acute hyperglycemia and to monitor those who are being treated for ketoacidosis. A build up of ketones can occur whenever there is a decrease in the amount or effectiveness of insulin in the body.
       

    Prevention and Treatment

    The risk of having type 2 diabetes can be greatly decreased by losing excess weight, exercising, and eating a healthy diet with limited fat intake. By identifying pre-diabetic conditions and making the necessary lifestyle changes to lower glucose levels to normal levels, it may be possible to prevent type 2 diabetes or delay its onset by several years. Normalizing blood glucose can also minimize or prevent damage to veins, arteries and kidneys.

    Type 2 diabetics usually self-check their glucose one or more times a day. Type 2 diabetics are on a continuum, ranging from those who can control their glucose levels with diet and exercise, to those who can take oral medications, to those who need to take daily insulin injections. Many will move along the continuum as their disease progresses.

    The oral medications available fall into three classes. They include drugs that:

    • Stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin
    • Help make the body more sensitive to the insulin it is producing
    • Slow the absorption of carbohydrates in the stomach (slowing down the post-meal increase in blood glucose)
    • Block glucose from being reabsorbed from the urine by the kidneys
       

    Type 2 diabetics often take two or more of these medications and/or insulin injections, whatever it takes to achieve glucose control.

    Type 2 diabetics may occasionally encounter serious complications if they have ignored initial symptoms, if they have neglected their ongoing treatment, or if they have a serious stress to their system such as a heart attack or stroke or a severe infection. The effects of very high blood glucose levels and dehydration can be cumulative, leading to weakness, confusion, and in severe cases, to convulsions and coma that require immediate hospitalization.

  • Gestational diabetes

    Gestational diabetesis a form of high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) seen in some pregnant women, usually late in their pregnancy. The cause is unknown, but it is thought that some hormones from the placenta increase insulin resistance in the mother, causing elevated blood glucose levels. Those at an increased risk include women who:

    • Are overweight
    • Have had gestational diabetes with a previous pregnancy
    • Are older than 25 years
    • Have previously had a very large baby or have had a stillbirth
    • Have a close relative who has diabetes
    • Have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
    • Are of African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander ethnicity

    Most women are screened for gestational diabetes between their 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If gestational diabetes is found and not addressed, the baby is likely to be larger than normal, be born with low glucose levels, and be born prematurely. It can also cause complications such as high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia in the pregnant woman.

    The hyperglycemia associated with gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby''s fasting glucose level is measured, she is given a 100-gram glucose dose and her glucose level is measured at timed intervals. If at least two of the glucose levels at fasting, 1 hour, 2 hour, or 3 hour are above a certain level, then a diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made.

     

Time of Sample Collection Target Levels**
(**some labs may use different numbers)
Fasting (prior to glucose load) 95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/L)
1 hour after glucose load 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L)
2 hours after glucose load 155 mg/dL (8.6 mmol/L)
3 hours after glucose load 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L)

Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes should be tested at 6-12 weeks after they have delivered their baby to screen for persistent diabetes. This can be done with one of the following:

  • A fasting blood glucose
  • A 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)
  • An A1c test
     

Treatment

With gestational diabetes, the mother-to-be will need to eat a modified diet, get regular exercise, and monitor glucose levels as often as her health practitioner suggests. If more control is needed, she will be the 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 given insulin injections. At this time, oral medications are not commonly used.With gestational diabetes, the mother-to-be will need to eat a modified diet, get regular exercise, and monitor glucose levels as often as her health practitioner suggests. If more control is needed, she will be given insulin injections. At this time, oral medications are not commonly used.

Usually, the diabetic state resolves after the birth of the baby, although the woman remains at a higher risk of becoming a type 2 diabetic and she should be carefully monitored with any subsequent pregnancies. Right after birth, her baby will be monitored for signs of low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) and for any trouble breathing (respiratory distress).

  • Prediabetes

    Prediabetes, often referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), is characterized by glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnostic of diabetes. Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that an estimated 86 million adults in the U.S. had prediabetes in 2012. Usually those who have prediabetes do not have any symptoms but if nothing is done to lower their glucose levels, they are at an increased risk of developing diabetes within about 10 years.

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommend diabetes screening for adults age 45 and older and for adults who are under 45 years of age, overweight, and have any additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    Risk factors include:

    • Being overweight, obese, or physically inactive
    • Having a close (first degree) relative with diabetes
    • Being a woman who delivered a baby weighing more than 9 pounds or with a history of gestational diabetes
    • Being a woman with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
    • Being of a high-risk race or ethnicity such as African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, Pacific Islander
    • Having high blood pressure (hypertension) or taking medication for high blood pressure
    • Having a low HDL cholesterol level (less than 35 mg/dL or 0.90 mmol/L and/or a high triglyceride level (more than 250 mg/dL or 2.82 mmol/L)
    • Having an A1C equal to or above 5.7% or prediabetes identified by previous testing
    • Having a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD)
       

    The ADA also recommends that children who are overweight and have two or more risk factors should be considered for diabetes screening. If prediabetes is detected, then yearly follow-up testing is recommended.

    Signs and Symptoms

    Those with prediabetes will not have any signs or symptoms at the time of diagnosis.

    Laboratory Tests

    Screening and diagnostic tests are the same as those used for type 2 diabetes (see the Tests section).

    Monitoring is not generally indicated, but the ADA recommends that people with prediabetes be screened for the development of diabetes on a yearly basis.

    reverses diabetes type 2 young adults (⭐️ autoimmune) | reverses diabetes type 2 statistics australiahow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Treatment

    The primary focus of treatment for prediabetes and prevention of progression to type 2 diabetes is lifestyle changes. Weight loss, eating a healthy diet, and regular physical activity can help prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes and reduce blood glucose levels. In some cases, oral diabetes medications may also be prescribed.

  • Other types

    There are a variety of less common causes of diabetes. Any condition that damages the pancreas and/or affects insulin production or usage can lead to the development of diabetes.

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA or sometimes called diabetes type 1.5) is a slowly progressing type 1 diabetes that is often misdiagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Those who have it tend to produce some of their own insulin when first diagnosed and most have diabetes autoantibodies.

    Monogenic diabetes is a group of causes associated with faulty genes that affect the body''s skin a bronze color.

  • Pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and other pancreatic diseases that damage the pancreas and/or beta cell production
  • Pancreas trauma or removal
     
  • reverses diabetes type 2 youth (🔥 zucchini) | reverses diabetes type 2 natural diet recommendationshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Signs and Symptoms

    Signs and symptoms of these causes of diabetes correspond to those of diabetes in general. See the section on Signs and Symptoms for detailed information. There may also be additional symptoms linked to specific underlying conditions, such as hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis.

    Laboratory for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 Tests Laboratory Tests

    In addition to diabetes tests listed above, used for screening, diagnosing and monitoring, a few other tests may be used in the evaluation of other types and causes of diabetes:

    • Diabetes autoantibodies – this test may help detect LADA and distinguish it from type 2 diabetes if the diagnosis is unclear.
    • Genetic testing may be performed to detect the specific gene mutation associated with MODY or NDM. In some cases, family members may also be tested to determine if they have inherited the same altered gene.
    • Testing to detect other conditions that may cause diabetes is usually done separately. There is an awareness that these conditions are associated with an increased risk for the development of diabetes.
       

    reverses diabetes type 2 list (☑ research) | reverses diabetes type 2 youth statisticshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Treatment

    People who have underlying conditions will need to be treated for these conditions, in addition to diabetes treatment.

    Most of these cases of diabetes are not preventable, but maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle, managing underlying conditions, and normalizing blood glucose can help minimize or prevent further pancreas damage and vascular for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 and kidney damage.Most of these cases of diabetes are not preventable, but maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle, managing underlying conditions, and normalizing blood glucose can help minimize or prevent further pancreas damage and vascular and kidney damage.

    Those affected may need to self-check their glucose several times a day. Each case will be different, and a person''s Medical Odyssey: After a lifetime of unexplained illness, a retired nurse felt like no one could help. Then she discovered that a lab expert held the key to getting better.

    Related Images
    View More
    Location of the pancreas. Image credit: Don Bliss, National Cancer Institute
    View More
    The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Image credit: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
    View More
    By (http://www.scientificanimations.com/wiki-images/) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
    View More
    By Mikael Häggström [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
    View More
    Some people with diabetes check their glucose level several times a day.
    Related Content

    On this Site

    Tests: Glucose Tests, Continuous Glucose Monitoring, Insulin, C-Peptide, Urine Albumin and Albumin/Creatinine Ratio, A1c, Cystatin C, Creatinine Clearance, eGFR, HDL Cholesterol, Triglycerides, CMP, Lipid Profile, Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, Diabetes Autoantibodies, Blood Ketones, Fructosamine

    reverses diabetes type 2 fatigue (🔥 menu diet) | reverses diabetes type 2 and covid-19how to reverses diabetes type 2 for Conditions: Kidney Diseases, Pancreatic Diseases, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Metabolic Syndrome, Acidosis and Alkalosis, Neuropathy, Pregnancy

    Screening: Diabetes - Children (2-12), Teens (13-18), Young Adults (19-29), Adults (30-49), Adults (50 and Up)

    In the News: FDA Issues Safety Alerts for Some At-Home Tests (2019), Have Diabetes? Take Care When Preparing for Lab Tests (2019), New Study Finds No Reason for Glucose Monitoring for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 in Some Type 2 Diabetics (2017)In the News: FDA Issues Safety Alerts for Some At-Home Tests (2019), Have Diabetes? Take Care When Preparing for Lab Tests (2019), New Study Finds No Reason for Glucose Monitoring in Some Type 2 Diabetics (2017)


    Elsewhere on the Web

    FamilyDoctor.org: Diabetes
    Nemours: Diabetes Center
    NIDDK: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
    NIDDK: What I Need to Know About Gestational Diabetes
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Diabetes Public Health Resource
    American Diabetes Association
    UCSF Diabetes Education Online
    American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Myths
    Centers for Disease Control and for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 Prevention: Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy
    National Diabetes Education Program
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 Diabetes)
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes Treatment  
    JAMA Patient Page: Diabetes
    American Diabetes Association: Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy For Life, Information for Youth and their Families, Living with Type 2 DiabetesFamilyDoctor.org: Diabetes
    Nemours: Diabetes Center
    NIDDK: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
    NIDDK: What I Need to Know About Gestational Diabetes
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Diabetes Public Health Resource
    American Diabetes Association
    UCSF Diabetes Education Online
    American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Myths
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy
    National Diabetes Education Program
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 Diabetes)
    Healthychildren.org: Diabetes Treatment  
    JAMA Patient Page: Diabetes
    American Diabetes Association: Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy For Life, Information for Youth and their Families, Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    View Sources

    Sources Used the 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 in Current ReviewSources Used in Current Review

    Khardori, R. (Updated 2014 September 15). Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Medscape Drugs & Diseases [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/117739-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed September 2014.

    Khardori, R. (Updated 2014 September 16). Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Medscape Drugs & Diseases [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/117853-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed September 2014.

    Patel, S. and Reddy, D. (Updated 2012 September 18). Gestational Diabetes Testing Protocol. Medscape Drugs & Diseases [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2049380-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed September 2014.

    Nichols, G. (2014 September 24). The Existential Question of Prediabetes. Medscape Multispecialty [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/831930 through http://www.medscape.com. Accessed September 2014.

    Drobnik, J. and Schwartz, R. (Updated 2013 July 25). Dermatologic Manifestations of Hemochromatosis. Medscape Drugs & Diseases [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1104743-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed September 2014.

    (2012 July). Prediabetes, What You Need to Know. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/prediabetes_ES/ through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (Updated 2014 February 12). Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/type1and2/index.aspx the 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.(Updated 2014 February 12). Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/type1and2/index.aspx through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    reverses diabetes type 2 medications (🔴 headache) | reverses diabetes type 2 oralhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for (2014 June). Causes of Diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/causes/Causes_of_Diabetes_508.pdf through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (Updated 2014 July 28). National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14.htm through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (Updated 2014 September 10). Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/diagnosis/ through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (Updated 2014 August 27). Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/mody/index.aspx through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.(Updated 2014 August 27). Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/mody/index.aspx through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    Parkin, C. (2013 February). LADA, the Other Diabetes, Can Be Hard to Spot. Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetesforecast.org/2013/feb/lada-the-other-diabetes-can-be-hard-to-spot.html through http://www.diabetesforecast.org. Accessed September 2014.

    (2013 September). Gestational Diabetes: What You Need to Know. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/gestational_ES/ through http://www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (2014 January). Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2014. Diabetes Care Volume 37, Supplement 1 [On-line information]. Available online at http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/37/Supplement_1/S14.full.pdf+html through http://care.diabetesjournals.org. Accessed September 2014.

    (2014 January). Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Care Volume 37, Supplement 1 [On-line information]. Available online at http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/37/Supplement_1/S81.full.pdf+html through http://care.diabetesjournals.org. Accessed September 2014.

    (2013 September). Gestational Diabetes. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Gestational-Diabetes through http://www.acog.org. Accessed September 2014.

    Copeland, K. et. al. (2013 January 28). Management of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics v 131 (2) [On-line information]. Available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/131/2/364.full?sid=d1840c80-287b-43ca-ac9c-68b0b1d5dfa8 through http://pediatrics.aappublications.org. Accessed September 2014.

    (Reviewed 2013 August 2). Hemochromatosis. American Diabetes Association [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/related-conditions/hemochromatosis.html through http://www.diabetes.org. Accessed September 2014.

    Gebel, E. (2010 May). Another Kind of Diabetes: MODY, Often misdiagnosed, the disease is caused by a faulty gene. Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetesforecast.org/2010/may/another-kind-of-diabetes-mody.html through http://www.diabetesforecast.org. Accessed September 2014.

    Gebel, E. (2010 May). The Other Diabetes: LADA, or Type 1.5, Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults is gradually being understood. Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetesforecast.org/2010/may/the-other-diabetes-lada-or-type-1-5.html through http://www.diabetesforecast.org. Accessed September 2014.

    (2014 July). Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. From the National Diabetes Education Program [On-line information]. Available online at http://ndep.nih.gov/media/Overview-of-Diabetes-Children-508_2014.pdf through http://ndep.nih.gov. Accessed September 2014.

    (October 2014) U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Draft Recommendation Statement. Abnormal Glucose and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Adults: Screening. Available online at http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementDraft/screening-for-abnormal-glucose-and-type-2-diabetes-mellitus through http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org. Accessed November 22, 2014.

    July 25, 2013. Lisa Nainggolan. ACOG Issues New Practice Bulletin on Gestational Diabetes. Medscape News. Available online at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/808409 through http://www.medscape.com. Accessed October 29.

    July 01, 2014. Brown, HL. ACOG Guidelines at a Glance: Gestational Diabetes. Available online at http://contemporaryobgyn.modernmedicine.com/contemporary-obgyn/content/tags/acog-guidelines/acog-guidelines-glance-gestational-diabetes-mellitus through http://contemporaryobgyn.modernmedicine.com. Accessed October 2014.

    Soures Used in Previous Reviews

    Thomas, Clayton L., Editor (1997). Taber''s Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO.

    reverses diabetes type 2 zero to finals (🔥 by race) | reverses diabetes type 2 therapeutichow to reverses diabetes type 2 for (1995-2004). Diabetes Mellitus. The Merck Manual of Medical Information-Second Home Edition [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec13/ch165/ch165a.html?qt=Diabetes&alt=sh through http://www.merck.com.

    (2005 January). Diagnosis of Diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, NIH Publication No. 05-4642 [On-line information]. Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/diagnosis/index.htm through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov. Reaccessed 2/20/08.

    All About Diabetes. American Diabetes Association [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.diabetes.org/about-diabetes.jsp through http://www.diabetes.org. Reaccessed 2/20/08.

    National Diabetes Fact Sheet. Centers for Disease Control [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/factsheet.htm through http://www.cdc.gov.

    Jonnalagadda, S. (2004 February 19). Serum ketones. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003498.htm.

    Magee, C. (2005 December 9, Updated). Ketones – urine. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003585.htm.

    (2003). Ketone testing. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry, Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines [On-line information]. PDF available for 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 for download at http://www.nacb.org/lmpg/diabetes/5_diabetes_keytone.pdf#search='' through http://www.nacb.org.(2003). Ketone testing. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry, Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines [On-line information]. PDF available for download at http://www.nacb.org/lmpg/diabetes/5_diabetes_keytone.pdf#search='' through http://www.nacb.org.

    National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: National Diabetes Statistics (2005). Available online at http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/statistics/ through http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov.

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Recommendations and Rationale: Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (February 2003). Available online at http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/3rduspstf/gdm/gdmrr.htm through http://www.ahrq.gov.

    American Diabetes Association. Executive summary: standards of medical care in diabetes—2010. Jan 2010. Diabetes Care 33: S4-S10.

    (January 2010) The Endocrine Society Statement on the use of A1c for Diabetes Diagnosis and Risk Estimation. PDF available for download at http://www.endo-society.org/advocacy/upload/TES-Statement-on-A1C-Use.pdf through http://www.endo-society.org. Accessed January 2010.

    (Updated 2011 May 5). Basics about Diabetes. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/consumer/learn.htm through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed May 2011.

    (2011). National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011. CDC [On-line information]. PDF available for download at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed May 2011.

    reverses diabetes type 2 fasting blood sugar goal (☑ breakfast) | reverses diabetes type 2 lifestyle changeshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for (Updated 2010 October). Type 2 Diabetes Fact Sheet. National Institutes of Health [On-line information]. Available online at http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/Pdfs/Type2Diabetes(NIDDK).pdf through http://report.nih.gov. Accessed May 2011.

    Khardori, R. (Updated 2011 May 19). Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Medscape Reference [On-line the 1 last update 05 Aug 2020 information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/117853-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed May 2011.Khardori, R. (Updated 2011 May 19). Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Medscape Reference [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/117853-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed May 2011.

    Moore, T. (Updated 2011 April 13). Diabetes Mellitus and Pregnancy. Medscape Reference [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/127547-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed May 2011.

    Mayo Clinic Staff (2011 March 9). Diabetes. MayoClinic.com [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes/DS01121/METHOD=print through http://www.mayoclinic.com. Accessed May 2011.

    reverses diabetes type 2 juice (🔥 high blood sugar symptoms) | reverses diabetes type 2 your guide to getting startedhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Grenache, D. (Updated 2011 April). Diabetes Mellitus. ARUP Consult [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.arupconsult.com/Topics/DiabetesMellitus.html#tabs=0 through http://www.arupconsult.com. Accessed May 2011.

    Kerr, M. (Updated 2009 June 23) ADA 2009: New Blood Test Bridges Time Gap Between Serum Glucose and Hemoglobin A1c. Medscape Medical News [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/704358 through http://www.medscape.com. Accessed May 2011.

    American Diabetes Association. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2011. Diabetes Care January 2011 34:S11-S61. Available online at http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/34/Supplement_1/S11.full through http://care.diabetesjournals.org

    Metzger BE, et al. International association of diabetes and pregnancy study groups recommendations on the diagnosis and classification of hyperglycemia in pregnancy. Diabetes Care 2010; 33: 676-82.

    © 2001-2020 by American Association for Clinical Chemistry